Jones Avenue Laneway House   Sustainable Laneway House Renovation + Addition   Sustainable transformed an illegal, one-storey apartment (originally a converted garage) into a fully legal, classically proportioned, and visually stunning laneway house in Toronto’s east end Riverdale Pocket. The simple cedar deck boards that clad the feature-wall have been charred using a Japanese method known as shou-sugi-ban: a process of burning wood, dousing it, drying it, and then applying a coat of natural oil. The process renders the wood practically maintenance-free while adding resistance to fire and rot. A new concrete floor was poured with an in-floor radiant heating system. On sunny winter days, sunlight entering the home’s large windows warms the exposed polished concrete floor, keeping the space warm and comfortable while reducing the need for heating energy.  Although small and tucked away, this home is a big contribution to the city fabric. It demonstrates that challenging sites beget thoughtful designs, proving that laneway houses can add to, rather than detract from, an urban streetscape.  Approvals included Committee of Adjustment and Urban Forestry.
       
     
  Location:  Toronto, ON  Completion:  2013  Area:  167 m² / 1,800 ft²  Project Lead:  Craig Race  Energy Use Intensity (actual):  139 kWh/m²  Total Energy Demand Reduction from Typical:  50%  Air-Tightness:  2.5 ACH  Contractor:  Black General Contracting, Sequoia Woodworks & Restoration
       
     
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  Jones Avenue Laneway House   Sustainable Laneway House Renovation + Addition   Sustainable transformed an illegal, one-storey apartment (originally a converted garage) into a fully legal, classically proportioned, and visually stunning laneway house in Toronto’s east end Riverdale Pocket. The simple cedar deck boards that clad the feature-wall have been charred using a Japanese method known as shou-sugi-ban: a process of burning wood, dousing it, drying it, and then applying a coat of natural oil. The process renders the wood practically maintenance-free while adding resistance to fire and rot. A new concrete floor was poured with an in-floor radiant heating system. On sunny winter days, sunlight entering the home’s large windows warms the exposed polished concrete floor, keeping the space warm and comfortable while reducing the need for heating energy.  Although small and tucked away, this home is a big contribution to the city fabric. It demonstrates that challenging sites beget thoughtful designs, proving that laneway houses can add to, rather than detract from, an urban streetscape.  Approvals included Committee of Adjustment and Urban Forestry.
       
     

Jones Avenue Laneway House
Sustainable Laneway House Renovation + Addition

Sustainable transformed an illegal, one-storey apartment (originally a converted garage) into a fully legal, classically proportioned, and visually stunning laneway house in Toronto’s east end Riverdale Pocket. The simple cedar deck boards that clad the feature-wall have been charred using a Japanese method known as shou-sugi-ban: a process of burning wood, dousing it, drying it, and then applying a coat of natural oil. The process renders the wood practically maintenance-free while adding resistance to fire and rot. A new concrete floor was poured with an in-floor radiant heating system. On sunny winter days, sunlight entering the home’s large windows warms the exposed polished concrete floor, keeping the space warm and comfortable while reducing the need for heating energy.

Although small and tucked away, this home is a big contribution to the city fabric. It demonstrates that challenging sites beget thoughtful designs, proving that laneway houses can add to, rather than detract from, an urban streetscape.

Approvals included Committee of Adjustment and Urban Forestry.

  Location:  Toronto, ON  Completion:  2013  Area:  167 m² / 1,800 ft²  Project Lead:  Craig Race  Energy Use Intensity (actual):  139 kWh/m²  Total Energy Demand Reduction from Typical:  50%  Air-Tightness:  2.5 ACH  Contractor:  Black General Contracting, Sequoia Woodworks & Restoration
       
     

Location: Toronto, ON
Completion: 2013
Area: 167 m² / 1,800 ft²
Project Lead: Craig Race
Energy Use Intensity (actual): 139 kWh/m²
Total Energy Demand Reduction from Typical: 50%
Air-Tightness: 2.5 ACH
Contractor: Black General Contracting, Sequoia Woodworks & Restoration

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