Swallow Hollow   Purple Martin Condo Living   Swallow Hollow was created to emulate the Purple Martin’s natural habitat of collective dwelling, while providing them with protection from predators, and naturally ventilated spaces.  Taking advantage of the Purple Martin’s acceptability of grouped housing was essential. Our idea of creating a tree as well as the birdhouse required composing multiple birdhouses into one structure. The Purple Martin thrives under these conditions, so we have sized our design to suit. Contrary to traditional Martin Houses, we have embraced the informality as found in nature.  Sustainable always strives to reuse materials in the interest of ecology and cost. We propose reclaimed construction waste to build our Purple Martin house. Wood scraps from building sites are used for the birdhouses. The small dimensions of the house make most scraps large enough to accommodate the design. The “branches” could be any number of reclaimed materials – broom handles, fence poles, re-bar, etc. The mast could be a long fencepost, or demolished flagpole. Sourcing materials from recyclers at the time of construction would determine exact materials. Our design is flexible in accommodating materials.  Created by Sustainable for the 2010, Toronto Botanical Garden ‘For The Birds’ fundraiser, our Swallow Hollow was auctioned off to the highest bidder.
       
     
  Location:  Toronto, ON  Completion:  2011  Area:  0.8ft² /house  Client:  Toronto Botanical Garden  Competition:  For The Birds  Project Lead:  Steve Socha
       
     
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  Swallow Hollow   Purple Martin Condo Living   Swallow Hollow was created to emulate the Purple Martin’s natural habitat of collective dwelling, while providing them with protection from predators, and naturally ventilated spaces.  Taking advantage of the Purple Martin’s acceptability of grouped housing was essential. Our idea of creating a tree as well as the birdhouse required composing multiple birdhouses into one structure. The Purple Martin thrives under these conditions, so we have sized our design to suit. Contrary to traditional Martin Houses, we have embraced the informality as found in nature.  Sustainable always strives to reuse materials in the interest of ecology and cost. We propose reclaimed construction waste to build our Purple Martin house. Wood scraps from building sites are used for the birdhouses. The small dimensions of the house make most scraps large enough to accommodate the design. The “branches” could be any number of reclaimed materials – broom handles, fence poles, re-bar, etc. The mast could be a long fencepost, or demolished flagpole. Sourcing materials from recyclers at the time of construction would determine exact materials. Our design is flexible in accommodating materials.  Created by Sustainable for the 2010, Toronto Botanical Garden ‘For The Birds’ fundraiser, our Swallow Hollow was auctioned off to the highest bidder.
       
     

Swallow Hollow
Purple Martin Condo Living

Swallow Hollow was created to emulate the Purple Martin’s natural habitat of collective dwelling, while providing them with protection from predators, and naturally ventilated spaces.

Taking advantage of the Purple Martin’s acceptability of grouped housing was essential. Our idea of creating a tree as well as the birdhouse required composing multiple birdhouses into one structure. The Purple Martin thrives under these conditions, so we have sized our design to suit. Contrary to traditional Martin Houses, we have embraced the informality as found in nature.

Sustainable always strives to reuse materials in the interest of ecology and cost. We propose reclaimed construction waste to build our Purple Martin house. Wood scraps from building sites are used for the birdhouses. The small dimensions of the house make most scraps large enough to accommodate the design. The “branches” could be any number of reclaimed materials – broom handles, fence poles, re-bar, etc. The mast could be a long fencepost, or demolished flagpole. Sourcing materials from recyclers at the time of construction would determine exact materials. Our design is flexible in accommodating materials.

Created by Sustainable for the 2010, Toronto Botanical Garden ‘For The Birds’ fundraiser, our Swallow Hollow was auctioned off to the highest bidder.

  Location:  Toronto, ON  Completion:  2011  Area:  0.8ft² /house  Client:  Toronto Botanical Garden  Competition:  For The Birds  Project Lead:  Steve Socha
       
     

Location: Toronto, ON
Completion: 2011
Area: 0.8ft² /house
Client: Toronto Botanical Garden
Competition: For The Birds
Project Lead: Steve Socha

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